Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Story of Reflections Reflected!

It seems like a weird title, ain't it? The whole post is about one of the most popular, innovative, utilitarian and aesthetic piece of furniture which just takes about a little space on your walls. I am talking about mirrors, the one thing I enjoy making. I always feel that when you look into a creative mirror and like what you see, makes you happy.

Most of the mirrors I have made so far, have always had some sort of a reason and inspiration. I love to pick ideas off the streets or from my travels and make it a part of my creation. From my collection, I have picked up some lovelies and their stories.

Bluesome Vespa


Remember the days when the almost one motor bike was the Vespa? When I made this mirror, I spotted a beautiful blue antique scooter on the streets of Mumbai. Thats when I thought, its time to revive the past...it is time to relive the moments even I spent on this moped as a child!

Colour Recycled


I am big into recycling. I try to re-use as much as I can. Every time my carpenter shaves off wood to make the surface smooth, these beautiful curls of fine papyrus wood get wasted. Hence, I decided to process and colour them so that they last, and stuck them on my mirror. Turned out to be a creative mixture of natural and recycled material.

Tashi Delek


In 2009, we visited Sikkim for 15 days. We ventured in to the remotest areas bordering Tibet. The experience was divine. I noticed A lot of hotels, restaurants, shops were called "Tashi Delek". Infact the hotel we stayed was called "Tashi Delek" meaning 'may good luck come to you' in Bhutia. As soon as I got got home, "Tashi Delek" had to be on my mirror!

Jaala


Round, rich and deep blue, one of my favourite mirror is Jaala, meaning water. Water being the most important element of life, civilization and prosperity had to be a part of my work. My visit to Hampi made me implement some elements of the Vijayanagara kingdom into my work which survived and prospered because of the infinite Pushkarnis or man-made water holes and a splendid water supply despite the barren land of Hampi. This mirror marks the infinite water reservoirs and the riches of the kingdom of Vijaynagara.

Zig Zag


I had always seen zebras on television. It wasn't the most fascinating animal I had ever seen. In 2010, I visited Kenya when I actually got to see herds of them. I loved them instantly and again, it had to reflect in my work!

Eva La Rosa


While I lived in the USA, I had a little Indian handicraft store in a Farmers Market in Dayton. Every Sunday morning, he would sell beautiful, fresh roses from his farm for just $6! The placard saying "roses for just $6" was written so artistically, that I copied it on to my mirror.

Horn OK Please


How can we ever ignore the lovely slow moving trucks of our country? They are bright, bold and gorgeous. I can say they are "shaan" (pride) of India! So, I dedicated an entire mirror to these giant beauties of India!

Sheesha Peetal


During my travel to Hampi, The most important metal used during those times was copper or peetal. This place was also full of temples where spoons, diyas or lanterns were made from copper. Hence, I thought, I should dedicate my tall, green mirror to the temples and the common man of Vijayanagara.

Peacock Plumage

I was shocked to see the overwhelming intricate doors on all the houses on the island of Zanzibar! I had to use it...the idea, the design! It came popping in into another deep green mirror I made, I call it Peacock Plumage!

5 comments:

  1. fascinating!!!

    loved them all!!

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  2. I am so glad i came across this blog.
    Very innovative.
    Esp the Vespa.
    Some of them, although we've seen in the designs now-a-days [the Indian themes], looks refreshing here.

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  3. Hi Divenita..Thank you so much. Yes, the Vespa is my favourite as well. :)

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  4. all mirrors are so creatively done :) i loved the theme the way u have picked up thru travel, tv etc..just loved ur imagination and creativity :)

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